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's in cairo and meeting with the egyptian president mohammed morsi who has emerged as a key player in the effort to try to end the fighting between israel and hamas. but mr. morsi walking a very tight political and social, for that matter, tight rope. reza sayah joining us from cairo. reza, morsi playing a pivot on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking o
is in cairo where she met with president mohamed morsi of egypt who's mediating the discussions. as secretary clinton carries the official white house message there is new attention being paid to the president's strategic options in the region. "the washington post" writes president obama's decision to send his top diplomat on an emergency middle east peace making mission tuesday marked an administration shift to a more active vist role in the region's affairs and offered clues to how he may use the political elbow room afforded by a second term. beyond a cease-fire agreement, the president could try to throw his political clout behind a larger, long-term solution here. so far, no deal has materialized between israel and gaza. also, a bus bombing in tel aviv could push both sides further apart. 19 people were injured, three critically, in what was the first terror attack in israel in four years. police say, however, the incident was not a suicide bombing. joining me now, former assistant secretary of state, p.j. crowley and from tel aviv, nbc news correspondent stephanie gosk. thank you, both
with palestinian authority leaders and going to cairo to meet with mohamed morsi. i wouldn't be surprised based on what i'm hearing if there is no deal yet, she might come back to jerusalem, engage in some shuttle diplomacy, akin to henry kissinger. if israel moves into gaza with massive amounts of grounds forces, tanks, heavy artillery, armored personnel carriers, it will be a disaster. you know this area, you're there. you know how densely populated it is. it's going to be a serious problem and what the u.s. and egyptians, most of the international community, they want make sure israelis don't do it. but prime minister benjamin netanyahu say to keep the rockets and missiles come there coming in, they might have to do it. >> the death toll now in gaza, palestinian officials say is 137 people killed so far in the seven, now eight days going into the conflict. official death toll for israel is five. one soldier was killed today, first soldier killed by a rocket fires from gaza. joined by arwa damon and been ben wedeman. the blasts bring home the difficulties so many civilians face. people don't
. the launch pad for peace may be in cairo. in the last 24 hours egypt has been mediating high-stakes discussions between israeli and hamas leaders. speaking today egyptian prime minister hish m kandil said -- in gaza, palestinian medical officials report 95 people have been killed in gaza including 23 children. for the second straight day, israel bombed a building housing local and international media. the target of the attack was a commanding member of an islamic jihad group who also had an apartment in the building. meanwhile, hamas continues to send rockets deep into israel. last night, israel's iron dome intercepted two rockets headed for tel aviv. yesterday, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu had tough talks on twitter writing we are exacting a heavy price from hamas and the terrorist organizations. the idf is prepared for a significant expansion of its operation. in a press gaggle on route to cambodia this morning, deputy national security adviser ben rhodes says the white house's goal is to have nations with influence in the region speak for deescalation. speakin
, then go to israel, to cairo, to meet with mohammed morsi. what are you hearing about what's come out of her talks with netanyahu? >> well, they met for about two hours, and it wasn't just with the prime minister, but the defense minister of israel, the foreign minister, the national security team. they spent two hours going over what's going on. the statement released by the state department says she was briefed on the israeli position on all these issues. she's making it clear she wants to see a deescalation of what's going on. she uses the word a calm. they are avoiding the word cease-fire for right now but throughout the day, as you know, there was speculation coming from hamas and egyptian officials that they were close to a cease-fire agreement. the israelis downplaying that possibility, saying they weren't there until they actually had an agreement. there's no agreement and if anything, it looks like there was an intensification of the shelling in southern israel today by hamas and an intensification of israeli attacks in gaza witnessed by what happened to you guys, what you sa
is good. my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> cairo to istanbul, anger erupting over the latest conflict involving israel and hamas. these pictures come to us from indonesia, more than 5,000 people march through the streets of jakarta sunday, protesting israeli air strikes. the crowd marched to the u.s. embassy carrying flag and posters condemning israel. let's turn to egypt and a narrow strip of land that borders gaza. the rafa border, that's the crossing, this is gaza's only gateway to an arab ally. let's turn from this map to what is happening on the ground. the rafah crossing has become a dangerous place to be. it is a major crossing point for protesters and for those who are trying to smuggle weapons and supplies into gaza. israel says it is bombing smuggling tunnels that run under rafah. the border crossing is clogged with anti-israel protesters, trying to gain access to gaza. reza sayah reports. >> reporter: this is where egypt's border meets gaza. gaza is a small piece of land, about twice the size of washington, d.c. it has four gateways, three of them are inside israel. they're
prime minister benjamin netanyahu before jetting to cairo for talks with the president of egypt, mohammad morsi. the urgency underscored by the carnage in benghazi. rockets are lobbying back and forth. israeli air attacks killing 27 more palestinians bringing the death toll to 137 just in the last week. >> now a spokesman for hamas sounded cautiously optimistic that a cease-fire could be at hand telling cnn we are close, we are on the edge. cnn has reporters blanketing the region to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of this crisis in gaza. fred pleitgen is in ashkelon, ben wedemans in gaza city. ben wedeman, good morning, set the scene for me. >> reporter: yes, brooke, it was a noisezy night and we saw intense bombardment just behind where i'm standing. that was proceeded by increasing sort of mounting reports that a cease-fire was about to be announced or a period of calm. but it appears that there were problems within the israeli government that prime minister benjamin netanyahu and his foreign minister lieberman didn't see eye to eye with the defense minister who was
senior hamas official who said that at 9:00 p.m. cairo time, 10:00 p.m. eastern standard time, that there would be an announcement in cairo, by an official, from the egyptian government and from hamas, announcing some sort of agreement for at least a temporary cease-fire. however, we're hearing from other hamas officials that israel has yet to agree to this proposed cease-fire and the israelis are saying there is nothing as of yet. but the idea is rather than send out broad guidelines for a period of peace and calm, they just want to see if both sides can keep the peace. now, one of the concerns here is that it is not just hamas who is operating in gaza, there are other groups like islamic jihad, affiliated with iran, even smaller splinter groups out there that hamas doesn't necessarily control completely. and therefore that's why they want to give this -- this initial period to see if the peace can indeed or quiet or calm can hold. >> ben, in terms of the entire region, and we're standing sort of by a map which i want to show our viewers, this and is of israel, you've got the
in this process. i will carry this message to cairo tomorrow. i will also be consulting with president abas in ramala. let me also say to echo the prime minister, i'm very pleased that the iron dome defense system is performing so well. our partnership in support of this system represents america's enduring commitment to the safety and security of the israeli people and to israel's right to defend itself. but no defense is perfect. and our hearts break for the loss of every civilian israeli and palestinian and for all those who have been wounded or who are living in fear and danger. i know today was a difficult day. and i offer my deepest condolences to the loved ones of those who were lost and injured. in the end there is no substitute for security and for a just and lasting peace. and the current crisis certainly focuses us on the urgency of this broader goal. so in the days ahead the united states will work with our partners here in israel and across the region toward an outcome that bolsters security for the people of israel, improves conditions for the people of gaza and moves toward a
and hamas. the head of hamas is now making a statement in cairo. want to play that for you. >> translator: god took their hand off gaza and can build them to commit themselves to the conditions of the resistance. therefore, if we understand, this simplicity, we can understand as people of the media to tell the brave message of our people to the entire world, because we want the entire world to understand our people and our cause. and through you, we can explain the faces, the pale faces of the leaders of the enemy, because they have failed in their attempt and their attempts back fired against them. they wanted to destroy the infrastructure of the resistance in hamas. today, they claim they have done so, and they have not. this is -- they are bankrupt. i don't deny they have done so much, we could count how many buildings they have destroyed. and how many offices of the media they have destroyed and how many children they have kill ed. and how many journalists and how many photographers they have killed, just like you. we can count how many offices and how many buildings they have destroy
the video? >> yeah. >> that's a good question. i think there may have been a cairo element to that video. i think that may have had something to do with what happened in cairo. nobody died in cairo. and jumping to the conclusion or decide to go advance the conclusion in benghazi that, well, it's all about the video turned out to be hugely wrong and very misleading to the people that heard those talking points. we're talking about what's the difference in classified and unclassified talking points? apparently unclassified talking points are things that you can most of us, if you work hard enough, could get from anywhere. but if you've got classified talking points that show that's not right, why wouldn't you use those as well? did ambassador rice have access to different information in addition to the talking points, are i think a fair question for her and the add. >> and the president to answer. >> thank you. we got to run. more on the startling revelations about the c.i.a.'s libya talk points in a moment then dana perino, who is that, on the press corp.'s romance with the president. plus,
of the palestinian authority in the west bank, president mahmood abbas and then she will fly to cairo to meet with mohamed morsi. she won't meet with hamas which the u.s. government regards as a terrorist organization. netanyahu met last hour with secretary of state ban ki-moon. the two met with reporters only moments ago. >> unfortunately, mr. secretary, hamas and islamic jihad and the other terrorist groups do not share your concern about our civilian casualties or about civilian casualties at all. >> that was the israeli prime minister meeting with the u.s. secretary-general ban ki-moon. earlier today israel put an all-out ground assault of gaza on hold,age i'm quoting, to give limited time for a diplomatic solution. egypt sees an end to the gaza conflict, that's see. president morsi says, the travesty of the israeli aggression on ga did will end in a few hours ap christiane amanpour is here and watching what's going on. the diplomacy is intense right now but it's by no means a done deal. >> it's not a done deal but by all the signals we're getting, it looks like both sides feel they are j
forward. secretary of state hillary clinton is in cairo. we talked of a cease-fire yesterday at this time and so far there has been no agreement. today's events have pushed off an agreement even further. gregg: leland vittert we'll check back with you. can secretary clinton get both sides to agree on anything or are we in for more violence? jack keane will join us live. >> the labor department just releasing its weekly unemployment claims report. applications falling a little from the week before but still high at 410,000. the labor department blaming the recent spike in claims on superstorm sandy. last week's numbers were the first time we saw above 400,000 in more than a year. we are learning that has been resides up by 12,000. it was originally reported at 439,000 and was 451,000. that's an 8-month high for reporting. gregg: new applications for unemployment benefits fluctuated between 380,000 and 390,000. jobless claims have stayed above 300,000 and spiked in early 2009. they must fall below 375,000 to indicate the job market is strong enough to lower the unemployment rate. >> unions
. >> unbelievable. more than 100,000 people flooded into downtown cairo. this time they are protesting the current president martha maccallum and his power grab. they are disillusioned with what he has brought to their country. then you have this happening. police firing teargas. gypt's highest courts refusing to work in protest of morsi's actions. steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo. the protests looked like the unrest we saw in that same square back in 2009 and the arab spring and the overthrow of mubarak. how dangerous is it? is it more dangerous now? >> this certainly allows similarities between what we saw last night and those demonstrations that overthrew mubarak. hundreds of thousands of people are energized. many of them want this president out. but a couple of important differences. the current president martha maccallum was elected by 52% of the vote just five months ap a - the current president mohamed morsi haas elected by 52% of the vote. martha: it was a close election and the other choice may have been a more democratic choice. people were searching for new leadership and th
expressing support. the u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon is in cairo for a diplomatic solution. here's what shimon peres said today to piers morgan about egypt's role. >> we have two surprises. the positive is the constructive role that the egyptian president is displaying right now, and we appreciate very much his efforts. the other is the iranians. they are trying again to encourage the hamas to continue the shooting, the bombing. they are trying to send them arms. they are out of their mind. >> reporter: joined now by "new york times" cairo bureau chief david kirkpatrick. also ann marie slaughter, princeton university, formerly with the u.s. state department. what do you make of what you have seen over the last 24, 48 hours here on the ground? and most particularly, the possibility of some sort of negotiated settlement? >> well, i think israeli president shimon peres had it right. there are some good words to be said about president mohamed morsi. he is caught on the horns of a dilemma. he's caught between his own public opinion which is very, very an tag nasic to israel and the leads of
with the leader of hamas in cairo and asked him about the attack. >> i'm asking you, did hamas claim responsibility? did hamas do that? >> translator: not hamas, not other people, not hamas. no one can announce except those who commit it, not me. the building lesson is what matters. who committed the circumstances that led to this operation. it is netanyahu with his crimes in killing the kids of gaza. and he creates such ramifications everywhere. this could lead to any kind of reaction as retaliation for what happened in gaza. >> our reporters in gaza city said when that -- when the bombing was announced from loud speakers in hamas, there was celebratory gunfire in gaza city. i spoke to christianne amanpour about her interview. >> you pressed on whether they would ever recognize israel. he gave a lot of talking points. this is finally what he to say. let's listen. >> you say you would accept a two-state solution but won't recognize israel's right to exist. >> i accept the state of the 1967. how can i accept israel? they have occupied my land. i need recognition, not the israelis. th
. christiane amanpour had an exclusive leader with the hamas leader in cairo and asked him about that specific attack. >> no, no, i'm asking you, did hamas claim responsibility? did hamas do that? >> not hamas, not other people from -- not hamas. no one can announce those except those who committed it. not me. the lesson is what matters of the what led to this? who created the circumstances that led to this operations. it is netanyahu with his crimes in killing the kids of gaza, and the continuation. he creates such rea ramificatio. this could lead to what happened in gaza. >> our reporter said when the bombing was announced from loud speakers, there was celebration there in gaza city. i spoke to christiane amanpour. >> reporter: you were wondering about the agreement, let's hear what he had to say, let's listen. >> you say you would accept a two-state solution, but that you will not recognize israel's right to exist? >> i accept a state of the 1967. how can i accept israel? they have occupied my land. i need recognition, not the israelis. this is a reverse question. >> what do you make of wha
in tel-aviv. christiane amanpour had an exclusive interview with the hamas leader in cairo and asked him about that specific attack. >> no, no. i'm asking you. did hamas claim responsibility? did hamas do that? >> translator: not hamas. not other people from -- not hamas. no one can announce except those who committed. not me. the lesson is what matters. what led to this? who created the circumstances that led to this operations. it is netanyahu with his crimes in killing the kids of gaza and the continuation of aggression. ramifications everywhere. this could lead to any kind of reaction as retaliation for what happened in gaza. >> our reporters in gaza city said that when that -- the bombing was announced from loud speakers in mosques, there was some celebratory gunfire heard throughout the city in gaza city. i spoke with christiane amanpour about her interview with the hamas leader. christiane, you repeatedly pressed the head of hamas about whether or not they would ever recognize israel. he gave a lot of talking points. you really pressed him on it. this is finally what he had to say
. -- >> that policy, don, when you watcha what had happened happenn cairo at the embassy there, in been ben at our consulate and a variety of embassy locations around september 11, how do you respond when people ask, is history repeating itself? is this 1979 all over again? >> we saw in cairo, after a day or two, the egyptian government absolutely stepped in and provided the kind of security that we needed. so cairo is a slightly different case. but in benghazi, we see that the government there is not capable of providing the security that we needed there and so, you have a tragedy which was in some senses avoidable and goes beyond the deaths of that's four very brave americans. it really is a foreign policy failure. and so, you need to tie the issue of adequate security for the compound for the larger issue of what our foreign policy is and what our foreign policy image is overseas. >> i would love to have that discussion with you in the future. it's a big discussion and one that we want to have. it's great to have nuthe program. thank you for sharing your thoughts, your memories today. we look f
. israel denies losing any aircraft. egypt is trying to stop this war before it is too late. cairo's intelligence chief is spearheading talks to end the violence. but on the border, peace looks like an unlikely prospect. our senior international correspondent, ben wedeman joins us now between the border between israel and gaza. ben, ground war, are we about to witness that? >> reporter: i don't think immediately, don. i think there's still time needed to get the israeli military ready for a ground invasion. keep in mind that gaza is an area just twice the size of washington, d.c., with a population of 1.5 million people. any military force that goes in there has got to contend with the possibility of a lot of civilian casualties and a fair amount of resistance, from hamas fighters. now, what we're seeing here on the border are intense preparations, all night long. we've been watching as big trucks carrying tanks, carrying armored personnel carriers have been going up and down the road. a lot of soldiers in this area. the israeli government has yet to say when or if they would final
countries out of the meeting that they had in cairo, to show up here in gaza, perhaps tomorrow. we are waiting also to hear what is going to happen when it comes to the ground troops that israel has amassed on the border. now, right now we're hearing the sound of planes. and that usually means only one thing, that there will be air strikes that follow. and it is this time of night into the wee hours in the morning that things get very, very intense with lots of glass, air strikes. but we know that there have been blasts coming from the israeli ships in the sea. we ourselves have experienced loud booms and bangs coming from the sea, right there along the water. so there are concerns, people are not in the streets. most have hunkered down in their homes. most of the businesses have been closed. we know that more people have been killed here, including militants and civilians. and we know that more people have been injured. sara sidner. >> this is just unbelievable, this photo of a baby, the staffer holding the baby son. his name is omar. he was fatally burned, according to reports. b
, no the a premeditated response to of what had transpired in cairo. >> so how did that happen? how was that accurate at the time? if we know that this was in fact a premeditated, not spontaneous occurrence? >> well, we don't know the degree it was premeditated. that's still something that's under investigation. how much advance planning was there or was this planned within 24 hours or the same day. so that's a question we still have to the get to the bottom of, but the important point in terms of the ambassador's statement on that sunday talk program is she was using the intelligence community's best estimate. at that time when she appeared on the sunday talk shows, the intelligence community still believed that that began as a protest, that, yes, there were terrorists and extremists involved, but that it began as a protest. so i don't see how we can fall the ambassador for using what the intelligence community said was their best assessment. in fact, in my view if she had deviated from that, if she had departed from what the intelligence community said they thought took place, then she would have b
this in cairo alongside secretary of state, hillary clinton. in jerusalem, the israeli prime minister, binyamin netanyahu, confirmed the deal saying that he had agreed to give the cease-fire a chance after speaking with president obama. secretary of state, hillary clinton said the united states and egypt will work together in working toward long-term peace in the middle east. listen. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today if a cease-fire in gaza, and now a broader calm returns. >> the truce is hours after a bomb tore through a bus near israel's defense ministry in tel aviv. the explosion injured two dozen people, hamas leaders praised the attack but did not take responsibility. in gaza, israel struck more than 100 targets including hamas government buildings. officials in the palestinian territory set to strike and killed to dozen including to children. we have coverage from jonathan hunt at the united nations but, first, we go to david lee miller on the ground in southern israel. >>reporter: the question, is the cease-fire going to hold? we are about a mile or so from the israeli an
,000 people filled cairo's square raging against the president mohammed wrshg orsi. >> pro tests chanting leave, leave de p manning he reverse his power grab from last week. morsi's opponent through tear gas at one another. >>> 6 months before anwaral can i was killed this according to newly released state department documents. requested him to pick up an important letter in person the letter telling him his passport would be taken away. there is no evidence that he received that letter. >> like a terrorist is going to pick that one up. big taco being -- big tobacco package they deceived people about the darrenings of smoking. they have to include the specific facts of the danger. the ads will run as long as 2 years the tobacco company could try to appeal. >> a north carolina college could be heading to court after taking the christmas outer christmas trees. the alliance defending freedom group threaten to do sue the college accusing them of violating first mainedment rights. they had an announcement for christmas tree sales with you it was changed to say holiday trees instead. why? it ca
, in the hour and a half between the time the announcement was made in cairo and the cease-fire went into effect, we saw increasing numbers of israeli air strikes, artillery barrages into gaza city itself. some of them quite close to where i'm standing. and we saw three separate volley of rockets fired from gaza city toward israel. it did seem as if they were working against the clock to get just a few last whips in or hits in to the other side before the cease-fire went into effect. when it did go into effect, it became very calm, very quiet. then we started to hear celebratory gunfire coming from a bit of the distance from here. but it came closer and closer and we saw more and more cars out on the street. more than we've seen now for the last eight days for quite some time. there were very few cars out. definitely after dark, hardly any. but it went very quickly from pretty quiet to very noisy here in gaza city. >> can you talk about celebratory, some people celebrating that it's over and they could live their lives and they weren't afraid. others possibly celebrating they thought they scored
their children is our blood too. >> now to cairo and reza sayah, he joins me now. egypt condemns the israeli attacks, but so far says it will not break a long-standing agreement with israel. so what kind of bind is egyptian president morsi in over this conflict? >> reporter: well, he certainly has to walk a tight rope and mohamed morsi, the egyptian president is learning how quickly how difficult it is to be the president of egypt. here is why the situation is packed with so much drama and intrigue. for more than 30 years, mohamed morsi, a member of the muslim brotherhood and the movement were on the outside to israeli/palestinian conflict. they didn't have much of a role under the mubarak regime. then came the revolution, in came the muslim brotherhood, very influential in this current government, with the promise that they're going to change things, that they're no longer going to tolerate and put up with israeli aggression and oppression of the palestinians, and this is the promise that they have made so far. they have delivered a lot of rhetoric, condenecticudemnation seems like that's a
of the operations. >> thank you very much, fred. the arab league is holding an emergency session in cairo, ejiment, to discuss the gaza/israel conflict. they say the bloc should review the peace proposals to israel and its entire stance on the peace process in response to the conflict in gaza. >> protesters have taken to the streets in arab countries to show their solidarity to palestinians in gaza. tens of thousands of protesters filled the streets in egypt's capital. protesters in the nation of turkey set an israeli flag on fire, also a photo of benjamin netanyahu during a demonstration last evening. >>> president obama makes history this weekend with a three-nation tour of asia. the president is on his way to thailand right now, but it are rr the second leg of the trip that makes it historic, he's visiting myanmar. he wraps up his oversees trip in cambodia. he'll attend the east asia summit before returning to the united states on wednesday. >> rescue planes are still searching for two crew members missing after an oil rig exploding in the gulf of mexico. at least 11 people were injured in the
who was definitely pretty tough in his remarks in a news conference out of cairo. he says israel has to make the first move. he was angry with benjamin netanyahu regarding the killing of one of hamas's top military commanders. i want you to listen to what he said this morning. >> translator: today netanyahu wanted to achieve three goals with several messages, but he did not succeed. yes, no doubt he succeeded in assassinating the heroic leader, but he wanted to maintain his ability in deterence, but it failed. >> you have been covering this region for a long time. when you hear him and you hear the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu saying that there is -- they're not going wait around forever here, is this political bluster? is this rhetted rhetoric? is there something more behind this? are we going to see an escalation? >> i think at the moment it does feel like political bluster on all sides. i mean, imagine this as well. when he was speaking there in cairo, at the same time it was just after a building used by palestinian media inside gaza had been struck by israeli missil
their head together aniston the violence. bill: she's going to go to jerusalem, and cairo, with the sepgs o exception of gaza city. bill: fighting to keep a 60-year-old tradition going people are fighting. martha: nascar champion brad cowalousky joins us live in the studio here. we'll be back. martha: atheists seem to have ended a 60-year-old christmas tradition in santa monica, california. way to go, right? district judge audrey b. collins denying a request to allow the display of religious nativity while their lawsuit plays out against the city. >> it was something i grew up nothing. i think it' knowing. i think it's kind of sad. martha: they are trying to put a stop to it in that town. the city council passed a measure on the heels of a dispute last winter after atheists put up these displays with anti-god sentiment. the judge says the displays were starting to drain city resources. bill: how about that. some are calling him the new face of nascar, and he just won the nascar sprint cup title. brad keselowski is with me now in studio and this guy has a story to tell. hey, man congratulati
officials, palestinian officials in ramallah. she's now in cairo as well trying to push forward with the cease fire but really since last night, there really has not been much progress or at least public progress towards a cease-fire. in fact, today, at noon, local time, when that bus in tel aviv was hit by a bomb, that really did ratch chet up the tension -- ratchet up the tension quite a lot. in fact, right where i'm standing, after the news spread of the bombing, there was a very large explosion from an israeli air strike just nearby. >> ben, has anyone claimed responsibility for the bus attack? >> reporter: no. nobody actually has. now, initially, there were -- there was -- there are moves in gaza city that were announcing that this was the work of so- called lions from the west bank and some people assumed that because they are coming from hamas, the announcement was coming from hamas-controlled mosques, that hamas was claiming responsibility. no one has claimed responsibility. hamas did quote/unquote bless the operation saying that, according to one hamas official, that it
, secretary of state hillary clinton is headed to jerusalem ramallah and cairo to help hopefully calm tensions in the region. her trip comes as a senior hamas official says no cease-fire deal with israel is in place but an agreement is close. how close is a cease-fire, if at all? >> lori, close doesn't really count very often at these kinds of deals. either you got a deal or you don't, and right now there is no confirmation from anyone officially that there is a deal. everyone says they are very close, but still in the past couple of hours, we've seen an almost unprecedented amount of artillery fire and then rocket fire coming back from the gaza strip that hasn't happened since this conflict began. in some ways that's a bad sign obviously it is more fire. in some ways it is a good sign because typically before there is a cease-fire deal, you often times get everyone trying to fire as much as they possibly can right up until the last minute. and that may be the case. so far today in israel, at least 20 people injured, an additional one person killed bringing the death total here in israel to fo
.s. ambassador has now extended to several dozen people. many of them with ties into egypt and cairo. what more do you know about that, sir? >> we do know that there are dozens of suspects. this threes right in the -- flies in the face of the administration told us that this was some mob and a video that got out of control. what is clear from the beginning it was terrorist attack that was coordinated. there were terrorist at it being activities in benghazi in months leading up to this. thanks to senator lindsey graham we're able to interview somebody there in tunisia. bill: you were just in tripoli. you did not come back with a favorable review. you have alleged that the administration is stonewalling. is that still the case now or has there been a little give-and-take on some information and questions you have? >> hopefully now we're past the election the administration will do the right thing. coming up to the election they did not. i sent the first letter over to secretary clinton on september 20th. they had the gal to print out pages on internet site and pretend they were somehow complying
envoy, a special envoy who went to cairo to meet with egyptian officials. the egyptian government, president mohamed morsi has been very much involved in trying to achieve a cease-fire together with representatives from turkey, from qatar. president and the secretary of state, the u.s. president, they've been talking to all sorts of leaders. let's see what happens. i'm only a few miles north of the gaza border right now. it's eerie here. the cafes are pretty much deserted. i was walking along the mediterranean beach. normally there would be a lot of people, it's a beautiful day here. pretty much deserted. i just got to an israeli area where there's a shelter for school kids. you hear the sirens going off. as soon as i got here a few hours ago the sirens went off. the soldiers rushed everyone into these bomb shelters, into these areas. you could see why people are terrified about what's going on. apparently in this particular inciden incident, when i heard the thuds, when i heard the sirens going off, the iron dome, this anti-missile system, seemed to have worked. we saw huge plume
understand there will be big demonstrations in cairo today. what are the risks right mow of egypt being drawn in fourth this conflict? >> the chances are actually fairly small. egypt has enough problems with it is with fighting militants next to gaza. egypt says it still respects the camp david peace accord signed with israel back in the late 1970s. obviously, we can expect egyptian politicians and leaders to make as much political hay as possible over this gaza violence, but it's highly unlikely that egypt has really the wherewithal or desire to get sucked into that conflict. i know from speaking to many egyptians, they don't have an appetite for it. they may sympathize with the people of gaza, but that sympathy does not extend to an eagerness or willingness to engage or become involved militarily in that conflict. >> all right, ben. in jerusalem this morning. thanks. >>> coming up later, soledad will be speaking to israel's deputy foreign minister. that's in our 7:00 hour. >>> here at home, president obama will have the four top leaders of congress over to the white house today to begin tal
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